Monthly Archives: January 2011

Food Riots

Foreign Affairs has a post on the “psychology of food riots.” The argument is that it isn’t the high prices that are dangerous but the sense of injustice felt by the poor towards hoarders and profiteers that leads to riots. … Continue reading

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Disconnect

Disconnect as verb and noun. The Egyptian regime has attempted to isolate its people both from each other and the rest of the world during the current crisis. Most recently Al-Jazeera has been banned from reporting and its broadcasts are … Continue reading

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Egyptian Protests

The world is certainly a fascinating place. January 25th is, apparently, Police Day in Egypt. This reminds me of the wonderful habit of naming short segments of Chicago streets after locally relevant ethnic heroes and of the oft-cherished Casimir Pulaski … Continue reading

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Grain Riots

Merriman (thanks again Open Yale and iTunes U — such a shame that there isn’t a recording of Spence‘s Modern Chinese History course) draws a distinction between “grain riots” and “riots over high food prices,” with the former dying out … Continue reading

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Been Nuanced

iTunes U is quite amazing. I’ve been filling an intellectual lacuna by listening to John Merriman’s European Civilization 1648-1945 course. Complimenting a piece by his mentor Charles Tilly, he says it “has not been nuanced in the past 25 years.” … Continue reading

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Tunis and Beijing, Cities and Transitions

As of the 15th of January, it is clear that there has been a political transition in Tunisia. The long time president, Ben Ali, came to power in a bloodless, even “constitutional coup” (if such things can be; the prior … Continue reading

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